Event Horizon Telescope project announces groundbreaking results

Event Horizon Telescope project announces groundbreaking results
The first-ever image of a black hole.

TUCSON, AZ (KOLD News 13) - The Event Horizon Telescope project and the National Science Foundation announced groundbreaking results in black hole research at a press conference on Wednesday, April 10.

The EHT project is an international collaboration that linked radio dishes across the globe in hopes to capture an image of a black hole.

The University of Arizona led this international effort, utilizing Arizona telescopes and observatories, UA’s Submillimeter Telescope on Mount Graham being one of them.

OK, so let’s recap. There is this super cool, super massive black hole and we finally get to see what it actually looks like.

Nerding out yet?

Black Hole Shape (Source: EHT)
Black Hole Shape (Source: EHT) (Source: ESO)

The NSF grant allowed the team to develop technology needed to analyze the telescope data and release the first results to the public.

Experts suggest that from this photo we can discover what a black hole really looks like and how gravity and matter hold up close to one. Here’s what else scientists are hoping to find out from these results.

This artist’s impression depicts a rapidly spinning supermassive black hole surrounded by an accretion disc. This thin disc of rotating material consists of the leftovers of a Sun-like star which was ripped apart by the tidal forces of the black hole. Shocks in the colliding debris as well as heat generated in accretion led to a burst of light, resembling a supernova explosion. (Source: EHT)
This artist’s impression depicts a rapidly spinning supermassive black hole surrounded by an accretion disc. This thin disc of rotating material consists of the leftovers of a Sun-like star which was ripped apart by the tidal forces of the black hole. Shocks in the colliding debris as well as heat generated in accretion led to a burst of light, resembling a supernova explosion. (Source: EHT) (Source: ESO, ESA/Hubble, M. Kornmesser)

Among the conference panel of EHT researchers is Daniel Marrone from University of Arizona in the Astronomy Department, Steward Observatory who was expected to answer questions along with the following researchers:

  • Sheperd Doeleman, EHT Director, Harvard University Senior Research Fellow, Center for Astrophysics at Harvard and Smithsonian
  • Avery Broderick, University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics
  • Sera Markoff, University of Amsterdam, Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, Gravitation and AstroParticle Physics Amsterdam

The event was streamed live online.

To view more details on the conference, click HERE.

And if you’re curious why every picture of a black hole - until now - has been an illustration, check out this video below.

If you’re totally loving becoming a black hole expert, you can find more videos from EHT here.

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