Tips for surviving triple-digit temperatures hitting Tucson this week

Tips for surviving triple-digit temperatures hitting Tucson this week
Living in the desert calls for different precautions, especially during summer. (Source: RapidEye)

TUCSON, Ariz. (KOLD News 13) - Living in the desert calls for different precautions, especially during summer.

An excessive heat warning will be in effect Thursday through Saturday and we could see highs of up to 110 degrees.

Since this our first real heat wave of the year, KOLD News 13 wanted to share some tips and tricks for surviving the summer in southern Arizona.


Drink More Water

The Mayo Clinic recommends men drink 15 1/2 cups of water daily and women drink 11 1/2 cups.

We lose water throughout the day, especially in summer from perspiration. Clearly, you need to be drinking more than that on a hot, summer day.

Some signs of dehydration can be headaches, tiredness or less frequent urination. Also, know the signs of heatstroke.


Ways To Stay Safe

When temperatures are high, stay inside,

If you do go outside, avoid the hottest part of the day -- which is usually 1-5 p.m. in southern Arizona.

If you have to go outside, please dress properly.

The CDC said you should:

  • Wear a hat
  • Bring sunscreen, at least SPF 15
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing
  • Take plenty of water
  • Limit time outdoors. Take breaks often

Who Is At Risk?

While heat stroke or heat exhaustion can hit anyone, the CDC said following people are more at-risk:

  • Infants
  • Young children
  • Older adults
  • People with chronic medical conditions

Know The Signs

Heat Stroke

  • Very high body temperature (above 103°F)
  • Red, hot, and dry skin (no sweating)
  • Rapid, strong pulse
  • Throbbing headache
  • Dizziness
  • Upset stomach
  • Confusion
  • Passing out

Heat Exhaustion

  • Heavy sweating
  • Paleness
  • Muscle cramps
  • Tiredness
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Upset stomach or vomiting
  • Fainting

What To Do

If you or someone else is exhibiting signs of heat stroke or heat exhaustion, call for help.

While waiting, the CDC said you can help the person by:

Heat Stroke

  • Do not give them fluids
  • Move the person into the shady area or indoors
  • Cool them down by placing them in a cool bath or shower, spraying them with a garden hose or fanning them
  • Continue until help arrives or the person’s body temperature falls below 102 degrees

Heat Exhaustion

  • Give them a cool, nonalcoholic beverage
  • Move the person into the shady area or indoors
  • Ask them rest
  • Cool them down by placing them in a cool bath or shower, spraying them with a garden hose or fanning them
  • Ask them to change into lightweight clothing

Copyright 2020 KOLD News 13. All rights reserved.