YCSO to release name of ‘Little Miss Nobody’ after girl’s remains were found in 1960

The Yavapai County Sheriff's Office raised enough money to complete the DNA sequencing for...
The Yavapai County Sheriff's Office raised enough money to complete the DNA sequencing for "Little Miss Nobody."(Arizona's Family)
Published: Mar. 13, 2022 at 10:14 AM MST|Updated: Mar. 13, 2022 at 10:15 AM MST
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PRESCOTT, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -- The Yavapai County Sheriff’s Office has announced that they made a break in a major cold case. After DNA analysis and extensive, authorities now know the name of the little girl whose remains were found in a remote desert in the county in 1960.

Currently known as “Little Miss Nobody,” the girl was found in Congress at the Sand Wash Creek on July 31, 1960. YCSO had thought that the girl was between three and six years old. Investigators at that time had believed that her remains were buried about a week or two before they were found, but investigators couldn’t find any injuries to her body. Ultimately, it was ruled a homicide and the case got national attention.

The Sheriff’s Office says it committed $1,000 and asked for the community to raise the remaining $4,000 to solve the case of “Little Miss Nobody.” In less than 24 hours, YCSO and a Texas DNA company called OTHRAM raised enough money to fund the specialized testing. Now, officials are planning to give a full update and overview of the investigation at Yavapai Community College in Prescott on Tuesday.

Arizona’s Family Reporter and True Crime Arizona host Briana Whitney will have more details on Tuesday.