Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center warns of Halloween hazards

Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center warns of Halloween hazards
Medicine that looks like candy. (Source: Tucson News Now)
Medicine that looks like candy. (Source: Tucson News Now)
Glow sticks (Source: Tucson News Now)
Glow sticks (Source: Tucson News Now)
Button batteries (Source: Tucson News Now)
Button batteries (Source: Tucson News Now)
Liquid candles. (Source: Tucson News Now)
Liquid candles. (Source: Tucson News Now)

TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) - The Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center warns parents to pay attention to potentially deadly Halloween hazards.
 
Dr. Keith Boesen, the information center's managing director said what your child eats or is exposed to can be a problem. 
 
He said that while glow sticks are helpful for drivers to see your child in the dark, they can be a problem if your child breaks them. If broken, he said don't panic. Instead, call the center for instructions on what to do based on your child's symptoms. He said concerns over broken glow sticks is one of the most common calls they get around this time of year.
 
"It is reassuring that it's nothing incredibly dangerous about it," he said. "It's just very irritating, so we want to wash it out."
 
There is another light source that is a bigger concern for the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center – liquid candles. Even when they are not burning, they can be dangerous to children who think it looks like a baby bottle.
 
"When a child drinks this liquid inside of here, it can pour out of the wick. It can easily get into the lungs and we've had children develop severe life-threatening pneumonia from the chemical that's in here," he said.
 
That is not the only potentially deadly Halloween threat. Boesen warns parents should watch for kids putting the button battery that powers fake candles in their mouths.
 
"It's not only a choking hazard, but if this gets stuck in a child's esophagus, it can actually burn a hole right through their tissue and children have died as a result of this," he said.
 
Something that is a concern all year long, but especially during Halloween, is kids mistaking medication for candy. Boesen urges parents to not keep them on the same counter. The mix up can be potentially deadly.

The Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center's main message is to make sure parents know they can call them 24 hours a day, seven days a week if they have any questions at 1-800-222-1222.
 
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